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20110701
20110731
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, the social security benefits drop 22%. that's a big hit for folks that are living on social security. so what can we do today, 25 years in advance, what small thing can we do today to social security which will build up the solvency and life of social security for even more years? that's a -- i think that's an honest challenge and we should view it as an honest challenge. not to eliminate social security but to say to the generation of younger workers in america, it's going to be there and you'll be darn lucky that it is there because a lot of seniors today can tell you the story of their lives paying into social security. they now receive the benefits. but what happened to their other plans for retirement? well, that little 401(k), that ira, that s.e.p. plan took a hit a few years ago, lost about 30% of its value. and for many americans with pension plans where their work, some of those companies went out of business and walked away from those pension obligations. social security has been there. we want it to be there in the future. so we can find ways to strengthen social security and give
in transforming themselves, she's one of the big reasons why. please help me in welcoming to the stage, liz schuller. [applause] >> thank you. all right. thank you, barry, for the introduction. and i'd like to think raj for raising the bar. thanks a lot for the rest of us and not those creative messaging tools that we all need to address inequality. i wish i would have heard her before my speech. so why am i here as part of this panel? the whole point of what i want to talk to you today is the power of collective action and how it could counter the rise in inequality and how unions fit into that picture. now, when i think about inequality, especially, as of late, i think about those teachers in wisconsin, construction workers in ohio, nurses in new hampshire, who have been locked out and denied their basic rights to collective bargaining. we've seen what it looks like the state capital in wisconsin and we show you now what's happening in office buildings all across this country. ♪ >> here's to america's workers. when the economy was down, they sacrificed. during tough times when executive
that submerged that's been debated about too big to fail, there's no point they did. in fact, when the republicans have the hearings on the international competition, two industry witnesses, one representing the bank, orientation, and one house from harvard who's been the supporter of a strong event and industry and skeptical of some regulations and committee both noted that there was a potential competitive disadvantage for large american financial institutions because we are so firm in not allowing bailouts. they noted that america has by far the strongest anti-public participation in bailout law and rules in the world and that this could be a problem for american institutions and others. the argument, bit way, that being designated as a systemically important financial institution is an advantage because you will be able to borrow more cheaply. this is -- we've heard of the gift that keeps on giving -- this is the gift that people keep on refusing. unanimously, any institution there that's discretion about to whether or not it was designated as systemically important has vehemen
republicans that signed it, and that's a pretty big number around here, and that's a pretty bipartisan effort around here. and then i began to despair because i didn't feel like we were making progress toward the goal that we all said -- not all of us but many of us said we wanted to get to, and then today we had this conversation with the gang of six who i think presented a plan, as the senator from texas said, that's not perfect and everybody is going to have a disagreement about this piece or that piece but does meet the three-part test by and large that i have come out to the floor and said time and time again i think we ought to meet for the people of colorado, which is who i represent. and what i also know is this, mr. president. at this remarkable time in the country's history, if we act in a way that leads to a downgrade of this country's credit rating, if we the 100 people that are in the united states senate at this moment don't step up to make sure that that doesn't happen, no one is ever going to care what pledge was made about this or that or where we drew the line in the sand. t
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4